What’s The Difference Between Transactional and Relationship Marketing?

What’s The Difference Between Transactional and Relational Marketing?

Let’s say you’re creating a marketing plan to sell garden hoses. Your marketing strategies and sales tactics are straightforward transactions. When you sell a product, your customer shops for price and options- length, thickness, type of material, etc.

There is little or no emotional involvement in the sale. The sale is a direct transaction using traditional sales techniques.

However, if you provide personal or professional services such as financial planning, tutoring, or any type of consulting, your marketing and sales tactics are relational, not transactional. Relational selling requires you to make a connection with potential clients or customer prior to making the sale. Relational selling is value driven, not price driven. You must assure potential clients or customers they are receiving a high-quality service delivered by a knowledgeable professional. In a relational model, there is emotional involvement in the sales process. Chances are that when you consider buying a  garden hose is sales process is not an emotionally-charged experience,

Think about the following:

  1. Do my marketing and sales efforts require transactional or relational strategies?
  2. If I’m marketing a professional service, what is the one key message I want my potential client to know?
  3. If I’m selling a product, what are the one or two most critical features and benefits of my product?

Keep in mind that marketing professional services is all about building and maintaining relationships with your clients and customers.

 

For more information about relationship and referral-based marketing, click HERE.

Some Things to Know Before You Build Your Marketing Plan

“If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.”

-Yogi Berra

You can find lots of online resources showing you how to write a marketing plan. Some use a fill-in-the­ blanks approach while others give you general guidelines and specify necessary topics to be included in the plan. There are marketing plan guidelines for promoting products and other types of plans for promoting services.

I’m not going into detail about what constitutes a marketing plan. I am going to ask you tough questions before you start. Your plan helps you organize your thinking. It’s a fluid document gives you a track to run on. It should be evaluated on a regular basis.

But what about the stuff no one tells you about writing a marketing plan?

Ask yourself:

  1. Why am I writing a marketing plan for my business?
  2. Did someone say I should?
  3. Can I write this by myself or do I need help?
  4. How much time and energy will it take to write the plan?

Key points:

  • In your plan, less of everything is more and creativity is crucial
  • Your plan is not a term paper, it’s an action document
  • Don’t diminish the quality of your marketing plan by watering it down with gratuitous information

Specifics:

  • Use everyday words, not jargon (hard to do for many people)
  • Summarize and synthesize key data points
  • Go easy on timelines and charts
  • Clearly articulate the difference between strategies and tactics
    • Strategies are what we want to accomplish
    • Tactics are specific tools used to implement the strategy
  • Include a budget and aim to get your budget figures “roughly right” not perfect

Here is a final note for those of you who want to look at planning in a new light.

“For battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.”

-Dwight D Eisenhower, who led the Allied Forces in the invasion against the Nazis during World War II.

 

Tale of Two Clothiers

It was the best of times for Beth. And, it was the best of times for Allie and Jenny. Two different retailer clothiers with two different approaches to marketing their business. Both in the start-up phase. Both on their way to becoming successful. Beth, Allie, and Jenny are in their late twenties. Beth is a mother of three and Allie and Jenny are in a long-term relationship. This is the story of their fledgling businesses.

First, a little background about Beth. Beth and her husband, Adam, lived in a New York City suburb. When Adam was offered a job in the Washington, D.C. area, they jumped at the opportunity and moved. At that time, Beth was working as a personal shopper at a top New York City department store. Eight years earlier, Beth attended fashion design school. She had the experience and credentials needed to succeed in business.

“If I don’t do it, somebody else will.”

When Beth first moved to the Washington, DC area, she looked at the demographic profile of her community and found the population of young couples was growing at a rate above the national average. In her community, there were no clothing stores for women in their 20s and 30s to buy, as Beth put it, “spunky modest clothes”. She knew this group of women cared how they looked. She was referring to Jewish women who want to dress modestly yet stylish.

Beth thought there might be a market for spunky modest clothes for women. So, she instinctively did what any good marketer would do. She reached out and asked questions. Beth asked a number of young women what problems they have finding stylish modest clothing. She asked what kinds of clothing they would like based on their religious standards. The answers were all the same. There was no place to get this type of clothing. Then she asked a more specific question regarding what type of apparel they couldn’t find. The answers were again consistent. They wanted tops, skirts, and dresses. And, they wanted reasonable prices. Beth knew price would be a key factor in determining whether women would purchase her clothes. The women also said the clothes found in department stores and online were not modest enough.

Beth took a deep breath and announced to Adam, “If I don’t do it, somebody else will”. And that’s how Beth started.

Beth made the decision to open a “store” based on what she knew, what she heard, and what was missing in the market. Beth found a gap and was going to fill it. Her store would be in the basement of her house. She applied and got a wholesaler business license. She was officially in business. The first agenda of business for Beth was to attend a fashion trade show in NewYork City. She knew exactly what types of clothing her customers would buy. She carefully sifted through the clothing designer’s merchandise and found just what she was looking for.

“I don’t believe this can happen.”

That’s what Adam said when the first box of clothing arrived on their doorstep. Boy, was he wrong! She placed her order for one large box of clothes. Three weeks later, she purchased seven boxes.

Beth’s first customer saw Beth’s bare-bones Facebook page. Beth does not remember how the customer found her on Facebook. The customer told Beth she never heard of Beth’s store but, “really liked her clothes”. When Beth checked her Facebook page, she found most of her friends were from the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area.

Beth knew enough about her customers’ shopping behavior that she had to:

  • Price her merchandise at least 40 percent below department stores
  • Accept American Express, in addition to the other major credit cards. Beth knew she would be paying higher processing fees and many stores do not accept American Express
  • Make it easy to shop by offering convenient hours as well as the ability to schedule a private appointment.

She quickly found out that taking American Express was satisfying a critical need for her customers: convenience. Beth made sure to tell her customers, “don’t leave home without it”. This was an important selling point.

Online Strategy – One Step at a Time

Beth was not in a rush to jump into the world of social media to promote her business. She had a basic business Facebook page. She wanted Facebook as her only online advertising vehicle.

Beth decided to hold off on creating a website. She did not want to spread herself too thin. After all, she wanted a lifestyle that would allow her to spend time with her family as well as run a business. To be on the safe side she purchased a domain name.

Keeping it Personal

In Beth’s community, word-of-mouth about anything was a powerful force in terms of influence. One satisfied customer told her friend, who told her friend, etc. What happened? Her primary source of referrals came via word-of-mouth. Beth did not purposely craft a word-of-mouth marketing strategy. Beth was unwittingly creating buzz for her store.

After being in business for six months, Beth was contacted by a group of women who sold jewelry, cosmetics, and other women’s items. They banded together to open a pop-up shop. The location, for this one-day event, which drew more than 100 women was held in one woman’s house. Beth considered this opportunity a success for her. As an added benefit, Beth was able to get the names and email addresses of all of the women who visited the shop.

Pop-up shops are temporary retail spaces. Open for one day or several weeks, they range from selling a single product to hosting a private event. On a bigger scale, think of those stores selling Halloween stuff, which pop up in early October and disappear a few days after Halloween. This particular group of retailers set-up a one night pop-up shop. The organizer of the event took responsibility to promote the event. Beth sold all of her clothes and took orders for more. This was a total marketing success.

Soon after the pop-up event, Beth decided to expand her marketing efforts. She rented a booth at a local fundraising event. She was the only retailer selling stylish clothes. Once again, she was able to sell clothes and expand her reach into the local and surrounding communities.

Beth has taken the concept of providing excellent customer service to a new level. From a marketing perspective, she is building and maintaining relationships. She prides herself on her personal approach to her customers’ needs. She invites customers to her house to try on clothes. She makes every effort for her customers to feel special. Beth constantly exceeds her customers’ expectations. She goes to great lengths to sell eye-catching wrappings. She’s open late in order for her customers to shop after work. Customers can make appointments. Beth has a no-strings attached return policy. According to Beth, this liberal return policy is unheard of in her community.

During the holiday season, Beth sent boxes of chocolate with thank you notes to her top ten customers. This customer appreciation gesture goes a long way in building and maintaining relationships.

Beth decided to do something special for her customers and prospective customers. She set up a backyard event in the early evening at her house. At the event, Beth provided refreshments and soft drinks. She assigned Adam the job of starting and maintaining a fire pit. And, of course, she displayed her latest styles. She sold plenty of clothes that evening. Besides telling her customers, Beth only used her Facebook page to promote the event.

I advised Beth to keep a database of her customers and prospects. Building the database can be as simple as creating a spreadsheet and listing the customers’ names, street address, city, state, zip, email, items purchased, date of all contacts, and how customers find about Beth’s store. I suggested that as her business grows, she might find more categories for her database.

Let’s review Beth’s journey, so far. She:

  • Identified her primary target group
  • Recognized a need
  • Found a way to fill the need
  • Slowly rolled out her marketing program
  • Set up a reward program for her top-tier customers
  • Initially relied on word-of-mouth referrals
  • Focused only on Facebook for her online presence.

I asked Beth what her marketing plans were for the near future. She was straightforward and said:

  • Build a website
  • Open a brick-and-mortar store
  • Expand my reach to cover the entire country

When I asked her what her merchandising strategy would be, she unflinchingly said: I want to expand to a one-stop shop selling maternity clothes, shoes, tights, and accessories. I want my customer to walk out of my store with a complete outfit.

Beth took an old-school approach to promoting her clothing business. She did this in part because the demand for her clothes spread like wild fire via word- of-mouth.

 

The Other Clothier

Allie, my daughter, and her partner Jenny live in Brooklyn, NY. They both have day jobs. Jenny is a marketing manager for an online marketing research company and Allie works as a fashion photographer at a retail clothing chain.

A bit of history: They like to shop for clothes. On the weekends, they would comb department stores, boutiques, and specialty clothing shops looking for the right look. But when it came time to find the right style and the right size, their shopping experience would fizzle out. They would leave these stores empty-handed and sometimes empty-hearted.

“If you want something badly enough, you just have to do it yourself.”

One day, while eating brunch in their apartment, Allie blurted out, “We need to work on some kind of creative project”. Jenny was taken aback. “But we have good jobs!” Allie then reminded Jenny about how frustrated they got trying to find clothes they like. The clothes they found were too feminine, too masculine, too boring.

Putting on her marketing hat, Jenny said, “Why not, instead of selling menswear which fit into feminine style and visa versa, we offer styles which are slightly adapted to fit women. They came up with the idea of being a retailer of “contemporary fashion for women seeking clothing that blurs the line of modern masculine and feminine style”.

After talking to their friends, Allie and Jenny realized they weren’t the only ones who were looking for such clothes. Other clothiers were selling this type of clothing but Allie and Jenny wanted their personal touch to be reflected on the clothes they sold.

Crowd Control

In order to get their business up and running, they turned to the Internet and used crowdfunding to finance the initial stages of their business. Crowdfunding is a way to obtain small amounts of money from many people. There are hundreds of crowdfunding platforms. Two of the most popular are Indiegogo.com and Kickstarter.com.

According to Forbes.com:

“Each (crowdfunding) campaign is set for a goal of an amount of money and a fixed number of days. Once the project is launched, each day will be counted down and the money raised tallied up for visitors to follow its success. Instead of traditional investors, crowdfunding campaigns are funded by the general public.”

Allie and Jenny’s goal was to raise $10,000 from their crowdfunding campaign to be used to start building their online store. The campaign yielded $12,500. Perks, offered to those who contributed money, ranged from receiving a limited edition tee shirt for a contribution of $30 to a personalized styling session with Allie and Jenny for a contribution of $400.

Online and On Target

How were Allie and Jenny able to raise that amount of money in 34 days? You guessed it, by using social media: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, Pinterest, Buzzfeed, and their existing barebones website. I was surprised to hear Jenny say they didn’t have the time and energy to put into using lots of social media platform.

Allie and Jenny’s Tumblr page features photos that range from their line of clothes to personal photos of Allie and Jenny. After one year in business, their Facebook page amassed more than 3,500 Likes. They Tweeted more than 2,600 times. On Instagram, they posted more than 900 times and have 6,400 followers. They pinned more than 520 times on Pinterest. After an article appeared on a Buzzfeed post that was linked to Allie and Jenny’s Instagram platform, their Instagram followers doubled in just a few days.

In terms of generating buzz and capturing email addresses, Pinterest was the least effective platform for them. Allie said Pinterest was a good way for most retailers selling clothing, accessories, and those selling household goods to get business. However, they claimed their market is not active on Pinterest, but is active on Instagram and Tumblr.

Allie and Jenny, as sophisticated marketers, understood that online and social media platforms were not the only way to sell clothes. To introduce their online store to their potential customers, they used social media to promote a runway fashion show in a bar in New York City. They attracted customers and got the media attention they were hoping for. During the first year, they were interviewed by six fashion style blogs and five online fashion news e-zines (online magazines).

Up Close and Personal

The runway fashion show was a big hit. In addition, they rented a table at a one-day local street fair and sold enough clothes to cover the cost of the table rental fee. They were not pleased with the idea of selling at a street fair. They realized most of the shoppers were looking for bargains. Their line of clothes was far from bargain-priced.

Allie and Jenny were invited to sell their clothes at a night market – an informal bazaar or street market held at night, usually featuring music and boutique vendors. The cost to rent a table to display their merchandise was $175 a night. They decided to display most of their clothing, but only sold accessories. Allie and Jenny knew that since there was no place to try on the clothes, they’d be better off just selling accessories.

They posted the event on Facebook and sent emails to their list of customers and prospects. More than 400 people attended the event. They made a small profit and more important met face-to-face with their target market.

Allie and Jenny are proud of their website. The feedback from friends and customers has been consistent: it’s bright; it shows off clothing in a clear way. The use of models helped potential customers see what the clothes look like on a person; and, the photography was creative.

Allie and Jenny have two long-term goals for their business. The first goal is to open a brick and mortar store in New York City. The second goal is to design their own line of clothes and sell them wholesale to retail stores. Good luck, Allie and Jenny!

Lessons Learned from Beth, Allie, and Jenny:

  • Beth, Allie, and Jenny had a clear vision of what they wanted before they started doing business.
  • They started small and slowly increased their product line.
  • They had a clear understanding of the purchasing habits of their respective markets and made the buying process as easy as possible. Remember, a key selling point Beth used was to make sure her customers knew she accepted American Express.
  • They are continually looking for and purchasing new styles, which fit their respective markets.
  • They knew that in order to keep their eye on the market, they had to communicate regularly with their strategic relationships. Allie and Jenny via social media and Beth via word-of-mouth and personal connections.


As of this writing, it’s still the best of times for the two clothiers.

 

Expert Tips on Marketing Your Psychotherapy Practice: In a Nutshell

Q: What are some common mistakes that you see people make when it comes to marketing their psychotherapy practices?

A. Evan: When people start their practice, they usually say , “I need a brochure. I need business cards, I need a blog, I need to Twitter, etc.” What happens in this situation is that are are putting the cart before the horse. Think of the type of referral that would be in the best position to refer clients to you. That is step one.

Here’s how to put the horse before the cart.

  1. Identify your potential type of referrer (physicians, other therapists, etc.)
  2. Craft a message to that group, in terms of  “what’s in it for the physician and their patients”
  3. Determine the best vehicle to communicate that message to that group (email, snail mail, brochures, etc.) . 

A. Gail: For example, I’m originally trained as a sex therapist and early in my practice as a sex therapist I wanted to promote sex therapy. I identified gynecologists. The message I wanted to share was that my practice conducts sexuality groups for women. We knew this was going to be a valuable resource for the gynecologists. What we did at that time was created a brochure and mailed them twice a year to more than 400 OB GYN’s. My practice began to develop a reputation among OB GYNs as someone who does sex therapy. Over time we got a lot of referrals and still do. 

Q:  How do you determine for each referral source, what their preferred medium of communication is?

A. Evan: The most effective way to reach other therapists is through networking (at in-person events or online on psychotherapy referral listservs).  We know that physicians do not respond to email. Clergy respond to email as well as snail mail.

Q:  For someone just starting out, what advice would you give them in terms of prioritizing their marketing efforts?

A. Gail: You must have a place where people can find you on the internet. I think it’s essential that people have some kind of online presence. However, the public is probably the hardest market to tap into. It doesn’t seem to be that the most efficient use of your time marketing online to the public. Online presence could take the form of listing yourself on Psychology Today or on your local professional association’s referral list.

—————————————–

Evan Leepson, MSW, MBA has more than 30 years experience creating and implementing effective marketing programs.

Gail Guttman, LCSW. As a therapist with more than 30 years of experience, Gail Guttman’s goals in therapy are to help clients live their lives, realize their potential and remain in positive, loving connection with their most important relationships.  

 

Readers can purchase Evan’s book at Critical Connections: The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

Evan and Gail also offer a one-day workshop entitled, Build an Action Plan to Create or Transform Your Psychotherapy Private Practice.

Are You Asking the Right Question?

This is a short tale of two focus groups. This tale is meant to show you how changing one word when asking a question can get you exactly what you’re looking for.

ABC Corporation sells laundry detergent. Sales were flat so they wanted to find out what was going on with their customers. Specifically, how could ABC improve their laundry detergent? So, they conducted a focus group with customers who used their product. The focus group moderator was selected from the company’s marketing department. This person had never conducted a focus group before.

This moderator asked the twelve people sitting around the conference table, 
“What do you need in terms of laundry detergent?” Blank stares filled
 the room. The participants were speechless. One participant asked, “I don’t know what I need”. Another said, “I need my clothes to be clean”. After going in circles, the group was unable to articulate any concrete need. The leader got frustrated and terminated the group after thirty minutes, without any suggestions. What a bust.

Another company, XYZ Corporation also sold laundry detergent and conducted a focus group with customers to find out how the corporation could improve its product. Same goal as ABC Corporation. This time the corporation hired a trained and experienced focus group facilitator. This facilitator asked the right question to group members.

“What problems are you having with your current laundry detergent?”

The answers came rolling off everyone’s tongues.

  • “I hate it when the liquid drips down the side of the bottle.”
  • “I can’t seem to figure out how to use the scoop.”
  • 
“The directions are written too small”. 

  • “The bottle is too heavy.”
  • “The handle is too small.”
  • “I don’t know if I’m getting my money’s worth.”


The marketing department was impressed with the useful information provided by just twelve people. The facilitator presented her report to XYZ’s Product Development team. They conducted more groups and got more useful information about customer problems.

People can easily articulate their problem but struggle to express their needs. The more you know about your customers’ problems, the more successful you’ll be.

Taken from Critical Connections – The Step-By-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

How to Prevent Marketing Paralysis – Final Chapter

Help Is On The Way

If you’ve been suffering from the pain and anguish of marketing paralysis, don’t worry. You can get immediate and long-term relief by doing the following:

Phone a Friend. It’s a good idea to talk things over with a friend and get some advice. You might want to discuss a new idea, clarify a stumbling block, or just plain talk about your business. When you’re considering starting a solo business, it gets lonely quickly in the early stages of planning your business strategies.

Phone a friend who is not employed in your industry or profession. You want fresh eyes on your situation. You want the other person’s perspective. When you initially talk with your friends, do not ask them to solve your problem for you. However, most of the time, when someone gives you advice, the advice is more about what the other person needs rather than what you need.

Do not let them give you advice (easier said than done). Ask them to listen and act as a sounding board. Sometimes, just saying aloud what your situation is can be helpful. Now, you can brainstorm ideas or solutions.

Write It Down. Now it’s time to get back to basics. In order to jump-start your marketing efforts and prevent yourself from getting paralyzed, do the following:

In one or two sentences, write your answers to the following questions.

  • What are the unique characteristics of my target market?
  • What is my compelling message I want to communicate to my target market?
  • What is the number one most effective promotional vehicle to get my message out?

Use your answers to the above questions as a reminder to keep yourself on track and help you focus on where your business is going and what will be driving your marketing decisions. If you feel yourself becoming paralyzed, refer back to your answers.

What are your strengths and challenges?

Why are we talking about personal strengths and challenges? If we understand some of the more personal thoughts we have about marketing your business, we can get a better handle on how to overcome marketing paralysis.

A strength is a trait, characteristic, or skill that comes effortlessly to you. Sometimes others recognize your strengths while you minimize them. We usually take our strengths for granted. If something comes naturally to you, it’s a strength. Most likely you enjoy using your strengths. You’ve always valued your strengths. In a more ethereal sense, you can’t be great at doing something unless it’s a strength.

A challenge (intrinsic or extrinsic) is some activity that takes you out of your emotional and intellectual comfort zone and could cause paralysis. When you face a challenge, you’ll need to harness your internal strengths to overcome the challenge. My psychotherapist friends like to say that dealing with a challenge can be an area of personal growth.

There are two different approaches to working with your strengths and challenges. In the first approach, you identify your strengths and use them to their fullest advantage. In the second approach, you recognize your challenges and work to overcome them. Your strengths are not necessarily related to your challenges, but they can be.

If you identify your strengths and challenges, you’ll be able to build on them and meet any challenge that might pop up along the way.

Try this: Name two strengths you bring to building your business. Now, name two challenges you face. If you want to avoid marketing paralysis, go with your strengths.

Review

In Chapters 1 and 2, you learned about the causes of marketing paralysis. In Chapters 3, 4, and 5 learned the signs and symptoms of marketing paralysis. And, in Chapter 6 you learned about your strengths and challenges as related to marketing.

Now, you’re armed with all the weapons you need to overcome marketing paralysis. Go for it.

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

How to Prevent Marketing Paralysis – Chapter 5

Here is another symptom of marketing paralysis.

Boiling the ocean: When clients come to me for help, I ask what they’ve done and what they are planning to do to promote their business. I’ll usually hear something like: “I’m working on my website. I just started Tweeting. I’m blogging. I’m planning to speak at an upcoming local seminar.”

When I hear this litany of activities, I wonder if this person is trying to boil the ocean. The term “boil the ocean” is one of many business jargon phrases used to embellish a point. Boil the ocean means to take on too much, over-extend yourself, or become overly ambitious. This is a recipe for failure.

Next time you are at the seashore (if you live inland, a large lake or river will do), try to take that entire body of water and boil it. How are you going to do it? Now that you are disappointed you couldn’t boil the ocean, try this. Take a teaspoon from your kitchen drawer. Go back to the ocean, river, or lake you just visited. Dip the teaspoon in the ocean. Using a cigarette lighter, place it under the teaspoon and see what happens. In a matter of minutes, the water will boil. Congratulations, you have successfully boiled a teaspoon of oceanSo, what’s the point here? Be realistic in how much you can do. How many marketing related projects can anyone take on at a time? The key to successful marketing is to figure out how much time, energy, and money you can expend on your marketing efforts. Next time you feel overwhelmed by the number of things to do, think teaspoon.

So far, we’ve talked about three causes of marketing paralysis:

1. Using the wrong marketing model

2. Getting unhelpful or misguided advice

3. Getting overloaded with information.

We talked about some of the most prevalent signs and symptoms of marketing paralysis:

1. The glazed over look

2. Going down the rabbit hole

3. Second-guessing and overthinking, and,

4. Boiling the ocean.

Now, we will discuss the fifth symptom of marketing paralysis: Putting the cart before the horse. Metaphorically speaking, the cart represents a specific promotional tool (social media platforms, websites, print and broadcast, etc.). The horse represents your target group or customer segment.

Here’s how you can easily get paralyzed:

  1. You decide to start a business – (you’re starting off great)
  2. You write a marketing plan – (ok, so far, so good)
  3. You come up with an idea of how to promote your business (you’ve now put the cart before the horse)
  4. After you’ve come up with some innovative ways to promote your business (the cart), you think of who your customers are (the horse)

If you continue this way, chances are high that you’ll stall out your marketing efforts. It’s not too late to avoid this problem.

Try this:

First: “Who is my most important target group”. If you don’t know who your customers are, how are you going to make an informed choice as to what promotional vehicles to use?

Second: Create your sales message touting the benefits and features of your business.

 

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

 

How Did You Hear About Me?

When someone registers online for one of my marketing workshops or signs up for business and marketing coaching, my registration form asks, “How did you hear about me or how did you find out about the workshop?” Many people say they found me on the web or they received an email about my workshop or consulting services. I’ve never been satisfied with that answer.

So, when I meet that person at my workshop or at the time of their initial coaching session, I ask, “Prior to looking on the web or receiving an email, how did you hear about me?”

You’d be surprised at some of the responses I received:

  • “One of your clients told me about you, so I looked you up on the web and registered for the workshop.”
  • “I heard you speak at a conference.”
  • “I met you at a networking event.”
  • “A colleague told me about your marketing book”*

If the person initially said they received an email, I ask, “Do you remember who sent you that email?” I know it sounds like common sense, but it seems like word-of-mouth is a major marketing tactic when it comes to attending a workshop or seeking coaching help. That’s telling me to forge ahead by attending networking events and conferences. It’s telling me to submit proposals for workshops seminars.

What does this mean for you?

1: Think carefully about how you word the “How did you hear about us’ part of your online registration or order form. You might consider building in a drop down menu so customers can indicate exactly how they heard about you. Don’t get to detailed. Be careful, you want the person to move seamlessly through the registration process and not get hung up on this step.

2. When you meet your customer/client in person or live, always ask follow up questions about how they heard about you.

3. Keep track of where your business comes from. This is common sense but you’d be surprised about how many small business owners and providers of personal and professional services don’t have a basic database of customers and prospects.

If you have an effective way to capture “How did you find out about me?” data, then you are one-step ahead of the marketing game.

 

 * Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

How to Prevent Marketing Paralysis – Chapter 4

Last time we discussed one symptom of marketing paralysis: the glazed over look. Now, we’ll discuss two more symptoms: going down the rabbit hole and second-guessing/overthinking.

 According to the English Oxford Dictionary, ‘going down the rabbit hole’ refers to “a bizarre, confusing, or nonsensical situation or environment, typically one from which it is difficult to extricate oneself.”

This is an irresistible and uncontrollable urge to dive into the nitty-gritty and, unwittingly get stuck in the weeds of your situation. Rather than taking a step back and looking at the bigger picture, you focus on the minute details of your marketing campaign: the colors for your promotional information, key words to be used in your website, which social media platform to use, etc. Details, details, details.

There’s a time and place for the details. Don’t get me wrong, details can be complicated and can cause problems. But, don’t let the minutia drag you down in the early stages of creating a marketing campaign.

Think of a time when going down the rabbit hole hindered or halted your progress on a project. Now, think of a time when going down the rabbit hole helped you.

Now you know the three causes of marketing paralysis (using the wrong model of marketing, getting unhelpful or misguided advice, and information overload). You can identify two of the three signs and symptoms of marketing paralysis (the glaze and going down the rabbit hole).

We now focus on the third symptom: Second-guessing and overthinking.

Second-guessing and overthinking occurs when you question and doubt every decision you make, large or small. You think too much about your next move or think for too long. You expend emotional energy anticipating or predicting what negative thing might happen. Your thinking gets cloudy and your anxiety hits the roof. You wind up in the world of negativity. The result can be total shut down of your thinking and marketing efforts. Not good.

I’ve heard the following statements more than once from people starting out in business. “I’m always second guessing myself about my ability to start a business. I question whether I’m able to sell and whether I’m good enough to compete in the market.”

How can your prevent overthinking and second-guessing?

  1. Stay clear of others who ‘want to help you solve your problem’
  2. Go to the gym and sweat off your negativity (a symptom of over-thinking)
  3. Go for the ‘quick win’. Find a small project that’s easy to do and that gives you some payoff
  4. It takes about 20 minutes to calm down after experiencing an upsetting situation. Take 20 minutes to collect your thoughts.

 

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

How To Prevent Marketing Paralysis – Chapter 3

Signs and Symptoms

Now you are familiar with the three causes of marketing paralysis (using the wrong model of marketing, getting unhelpful or misguided advice, and information overload). We now move from causes of marketing paralysis to a discussion of the signs and symptoms of marketing paralysis.

One debilitating symptom is the glazed-over look in your eyes. The glazed over look is caused by information overload. It’s the look you get when trying to take your marketing ideas from concept to implementation. What happens to you? You lose clear vision and assume a dull, bored appearance. This is noticeable to those who look at you. You can’t seem to concentrate on your work and look like you have not slept in days. When your eyes glaze over, they become fixed and shiny, as if you are not seeing anything.

Some people, when working, get so spaced out that their computer screen looks blurry. It’s especially hard to avoid getting that glazed-over look when you’re using your tablet. The symptom tends to get worse if you’re trying to work at Starbucks. It’s been reported that some sufferers drift off to an alien galaxy. This is not good.

Have you experienced a glazed-over look when the dreaded word “marketing” is mentioned or when you’re trying to create your marketing campaign? Can you tell if you’re beginning to feel your eyes glaze over? If so, what do you experience?

Just being aware of what’s happening to you is the first step to recovery.

 

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing