What Do You Need?

ABC Corporation wanted to find out how they could improve their laundry detergent. So, they conducted a focus group with customers who used their product. The focus group moderator was selected from the company’s marketing department. This person had never conducted a focus group before. This 
facilitator asked each of the twelve people sitting around the conference table,
“What do you need in terms of laundry detergent?” Blank stares filled
 the room. The participants were speechless. One participant asked, “I don’t know what I need”. Another said, “I need my clothes to be clean”. After going around in circles, the group was unable to articulate any concrete need. The leader got frustrated and terminated the group after twenty minutes, without any suggestions.

Another company, XYZ Corporation also sold laundry detergent and conducted a focus group with customers to find out how the corporation could improve its product. Same goal as ABC. This time the focus group facilitator asked the right question to group members.

“What problems are you having with your current laundry detergent?”

The answers came rolling off everyone’s tongues.

“I hate it when the liquid drips down the side of the bottle.”

“I can’t seem to figure out how to use the scoop.”


“The directions are written too small”. 


“The bottle is too heavy.”

“The handle is too small.”

“I don’t know if I’m getting my money’s worth.”


The facilitator presented her report to XYZ’s Product Development team. The team was impressed with the useful information provided by just twelve people.

The more you know about your customers’ problems (needs!), the more effective, and successful your marketing strategies will be.

 

For an in-depth look at how to identify customer needs, go to www.criticalconnectionsbook.com

DailyBitsOf what?

Interview with Niklas Laninge

As a marketing consultant, published author, workshop presenter, and business advisor, I’ve been challenged to teach business concepts and processes in a concise and concrete manner. I thought I had it right. Just as I was feeling confident, Niklas Laninge from DailyBitsOf contacted me. He asked me if I’d like to write a bite-sized course on Overcoming Your Fear of Selling. Well, that sounds easy. Or was it? Each lesson of the mini-course would be send to subscribers via email. One a day for ten days. Maximum 300 words per lesson. It was not easy to synthesize my thoughts without dumbing-down the content. It was hard work. Now I was hooked. As of this writing, I have created four mini-courses. And, I thank Niklas Laninge from DailyBitsOf for his support and encouragement.

I had the privilege of interviewing Niklas Laninge, the co-founder of DailyBitsOf. What is DailyBitsOf? Their website says:

DailyBitsOf is a service for people who love learning. People whose curiosity never ends, who see gaining knowledge as an ongoing process and who believe they can acquire any skill they might need to handle work and life’s challenges. We know that finding time for learning can be difficult. We buy books that pile up, save articles that remain unread and rarely have time for that online course we’ve been longing to take. This is why we created DailyBitOf as a tool to help people create a daily habit of learning something new.

EL: What motivated you and your colleagues to start DailyBitsOf?

NL: We all love learning new things, but we all felt that life often gets in the way. Since we all have worked within tech for a long time we had so many examples of products and ideas that fail because of friction and not being able to cut through the noise. This is why we decided to create a simple learning format that would be delivered to a place where you already spend a lot of time at – email and Messenger.

 

EL: Tell me a little about your background?

NL: I’m a psychologist by training and a technologist by passion. I have built and launched a lot of software that all aimed at helping people change behaviors. One was a platform for therapists and their patients, which would allow the patients to have some digital support between sessions. In September I will release a book called Behavior Design which is a collection of the best research and application of research I have encountered during my eight years in helping people use technology to change behavior.

 

EL: I noticed you changed your business model several times in the past two years. Why did you do that?

NL: We started out by being more of a tool for companies to gain fans by teaching small micro-courses on topics relevant to their business. We quickly noticed that the courses we got from this business model didn’t resonate at all with our values or our core-users. So we decided to aim at making the impossible possible – ask people to pay for content. By doing so we would motivate the best experts to put out their courses on our platform, and raise the bar at the same time – quality wise.

 

EL: How do you find such creative course instructors?

NL: Hard work, googling, reading blogs and 100s of hours listening to various podcasts. Luckily many of them find us nowadays.

 

EL: What are some of your most popular courses?

NL: The two courses we have on behavioral economics are popular. We’re talking tens of thousands of people. Then there’s our courses on productivity with our course “How to Beat Procrastination” being the most popular within that category.

 

EL: If you could identify one thing that makes DailyBitsOf unique, what would that be?

NL: I’d guess it’s our ability to attract so many great experts and make it so easy for them to repackage their expertise. Also, our ability to deliver something as short as a 2 minute read that still have an impact on the way people behave.

 

EL: What are your plans for the future for DailyBitsOf?

NL: I’m always thinking about more platforms, like would Slack be a good place to consume a course? Then it’s packaging. When we started, micro-learning wasn’t really a thing, now I see new companies pop-up every week – even Google has its own version. So I’m thinking a lot about our role in this landscape. The big challenge is to get people to commit to more than just one course at a time. This is a challenge we’ll probably be tackling during summer (2017).

Niklas@dailybitsof.com

https://dailybitsof.com