How to Prevent Marketing Paralysis – Final Chapter

Help Is On The Way

If you’ve been suffering from the pain and anguish of marketing paralysis, don’t worry. You can get immediate and long-term relief by doing the following:

Phone a Friend. It’s a good idea to talk things over with a friend and get some advice. You might want to discuss a new idea, clarify a stumbling block, or just plain talk about your business. When you’re considering starting a solo business, it gets lonely quickly in the early stages of planning your business strategies.

Phone a friend who is not employed in your industry or profession. You want fresh eyes on your situation. You want the other person’s perspective. When you initially talk with your friends, do not ask them to solve your problem for you. However, most of the time, when someone gives you advice, the advice is more about what the other person needs rather than what you need.

Do not let them give you advice (easier said than done). Ask them to listen and act as a sounding board. Sometimes, just saying aloud what your situation is can be helpful. Now, you can brainstorm ideas or solutions.

Write It Down. Now it’s time to get back to basics. In order to jump-start your marketing efforts and prevent yourself from getting paralyzed, do the following:

In one or two sentences, write your answers to the following questions.

  • What are the unique characteristics of my target market?
  • What is my compelling message I want to communicate to my target market?
  • What is the number one most effective promotional vehicle to get my message out?

Use your answers to the above questions as a reminder to keep yourself on track and help you focus on where your business is going and what will be driving your marketing decisions. If you feel yourself becoming paralyzed, refer back to your answers.

What are your strengths and challenges?

Why are we talking about personal strengths and challenges? If we understand some of the more personal thoughts we have about marketing your business, we can get a better handle on how to overcome marketing paralysis.

A strength is a trait, characteristic, or skill that comes effortlessly to you. Sometimes others recognize your strengths while you minimize them. We usually take our strengths for granted. If something comes naturally to you, it’s a strength. Most likely you enjoy using your strengths. You’ve always valued your strengths. In a more ethereal sense, you can’t be great at doing something unless it’s a strength.

A challenge (intrinsic or extrinsic) is some activity that takes you out of your emotional and intellectual comfort zone and could cause paralysis. When you face a challenge, you’ll need to harness your internal strengths to overcome the challenge. My psychotherapist friends like to say that dealing with a challenge can be an area of personal growth.

There are two different approaches to working with your strengths and challenges. In the first approach, you identify your strengths and use them to their fullest advantage. In the second approach, you recognize your challenges and work to overcome them. Your strengths are not necessarily related to your challenges, but they can be.

If you identify your strengths and challenges, you’ll be able to build on them and meet any challenge that might pop up along the way.

Try this: Name two strengths you bring to building your business. Now, name two challenges you face. If you want to avoid marketing paralysis, go with your strengths.

Review

In Chapters 1 and 2, you learned about the causes of marketing paralysis. In Chapters 3, 4, and 5 learned the signs and symptoms of marketing paralysis. And, in Chapter 6 you learned about your strengths and challenges as related to marketing.

Now, you’re armed with all the weapons you need to overcome marketing paralysis. Go for it.

 

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

How to Prevent Marketing Paralysis – Chapter 5

Here is another symptom of marketing paralysis.

Boiling the ocean: When clients come to me for help, I ask what they have done and what they are planning to do to promote their business. I’ll usually hear something like: “I’m working on my website. I just started Tweeting. I’m blogging. I’m planning to speak at an upcoming local seminar.”

When I hear this litany of activities, I wonder if this person is trying to boil the ocean. The term “boil the ocean” is one of many business jargon phrases used to embellish a point. Boil the ocean means to take on too much, over-extend yourself, or become overly ambitious. This is a recipe for failure.

Next time you are at the seashore (if you live inland, a large lake or river will do), try to take that entire body of water and boil it. How are you going to do it? Now that you are disappointed you couldn’t boil the ocean, try this. Take a teaspoon from your kitchen drawer. Go back to the ocean, river, or lake you just visited. Dip the teaspoon in the ocean. Using a cigarette lighter, place it under the teaspoon and see what happens. In a matter of minutes, the water will boil. Congratulations, you have successfully boiled a teaspoon of oceanSo, what’s the point here? Be realistic in how much you can do. How many marketing related projects can anyone take on at a time? The key to successful marketing is to figure out how much time, energy, and money you can expend on your marketing efforts. Next time you feel overwhelmed by the number of things to do, think teaspoon.

So far, we’ve talked about three causes of marketing paralysis:

1. Using the wrong marketing model

2. Getting unhelpful or misguided advice

3. Getting overloaded with information.

We talked about some of the most prevalent signs and symptoms of marketing paralysis:

1. The glazed over look

2. Going down the rabbit hole

3. Second-guessing and overthinking, and,

4. Boiling the ocean.

Now, we will discuss the fifth symptom of marketing paralysis: Putting the cart before the horse. Metaphorically speaking, the cart represents a specific promotional tool (social media platforms, websites, print and broadcast, etc.). The horse represents your target group or customer segment.

Here’s how you can easily get paralyzed:

  1. You decide to start a business – (you’re starting off great)
  2. You write a marketing plan – (ok, so far, so good)
  3. You come up with an idea of how to promote your business (you’ve now put the cart before the horse)
  4. After you’ve come up with some innovative ways to promote your business (the cart), you think of who your customers are (the horse)

If you continue this way, chances are high that you’ll stall out your marketing efforts. It’s not too late to avoid this problem.

Try this:

First: “Who is my most important target group”. If you don’t know who your customers are, how are you going to make an informed choice as to what promotional vehicles to use?

Second: Create your sales message touting the benefits and features of your business.

 

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

 

How Did You Hear About Me?

When someone registers online for one of my marketing workshops or signs up for business and marketing coaching, my registration form asks, “How did you hear about me or how did you find out about the workshop?” Many people say they found me on the web or they received an email about my workshop or consulting services. I’ve never been satisfied with that answer.

So, when I meet that person at my workshop or at the time of their initial coaching session, I ask, “Prior to looking on the web or receiving an email, how did you hear about me?”

You’d be surprised at some of the responses I received:

  • “One of your clients told me about you, so I looked you up on the web and registered for the workshop.”
  • “I heard you speak at a conference.”
  • “I met you at a networking event.”
  • “A colleague told me about your marketing book”*

If the person initially said they received an email, I ask, “Do you remember who sent you that email?” I know it sounds like common sense, but it seems like word-of-mouth is a major marketing tactic when it comes to attending a workshop or seeking coaching help. That’s telling me to forge ahead by attending networking events and conferences. It’s telling me to submit proposals for workshops seminars.

What does this mean for you?

1: Think carefully about how you word the “How did you hear about us’ part of your online registration or order form. You might consider building in a drop down menu so customers can indicate exactly how they heard about you. Don’t get to detailed. Be careful, you want the person to move seamlessly through the registration process and not get hung up on this step.

2. When you meet your customer/client in person or live, always ask follow up questions about how they heard about you.

3. Keep track of where your business comes from. This is common sense but you’d be surprised about how many small business owners and providers of personal and professional services don’t have a basic database of customers and prospects.

If you have an effective way to capture “How did you find out about me?” data, then you are one-step ahead of the marketing game.

 

 * Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing