House of Cards?

QUICK QUIZ

Question 1: How many of your own business cards do you have in your wallet, purse, or brief case? If you have less than five, hurry up and put more in your wallet, purse, or briefcase. Or, have more printed.

Question 2: How many of your business cards do you have laying around your house or office? If you have fewer than fifty, go online now and order more.

Question 3: YES or NO. 
I have up-to-date business cards. If you answered No, you know what to do.

So, what’s the big deal about business cards? Along with having a prepared elevator speech, you should always have up-to-date business cards on hand. And, here’s an example of why.

I recently, attended a networking event. I met a lawyer who specializes in working with small business owners on legal matters. He was the perfect referral source for me. I wanted to follow up with him and at the end of our brief conversation, I asked him for his business card. He fished through his wallet and found a crumpled up, dog-eared business card. He took out the card and said, “Oh, my phone number changed, and so did my email address”. He scribbled his new contact information on the back of his card and handed it to me. I then thought twice about contacting him. There must be other lawyers with his specialty who don’t have crumpled, outdated business cards. I did not contact him.

You know what they say about first impressions. Is this the kind of first impression you want to make?

You can drive yourself crazy reading articles on the Internet about what to include or exclude on your business card, whether to purchase or use free templates, which fonts to use, etc.

6 tips for creating a legible and succinct business card

  1. Put your contact information on one side only.
  2. Use one or maybe two different fonts. If your customers are over the age of 50, pump up the size of the font.
  3. Put the least amount of contact information on your card. Do you need to put your landline, cell, fax, email address, mailing address, website, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, or Instagram logos on the card? Is it necessary to put an inspirational phrase on the card? Less is more.
  4. Make sure any graphic you use does not overshadow your contact information.
  5. Even though you get price discounts when you order larger quantities of cards, buy small quantities. You never know when your contact information might change.
  6. Before you go ahead and print your business cards, have a friend look it over. You’ll be surprised at, in the rush to print the card, glaring typos are made.

If you have any doubts about what your card should say and how it should look, check out other people’s cards. You might get some good ideas.

 

There’s lots more tips and tactics to build your business in Critical Connections-The Step-by-Step Guide to Transform Your Business Through Referral Marketing

Don’t Put the Cart Before the Horse

Here’s a story that demonstrates how to avoid putting the cart before the horse, in a marketing sense.

I was hired by a professional membership association to create a marketing plan. I’d be working under the auspices of the association’s newly formed Marketing Committee. The members of the committee had input into all aspects of the project. At the first meeting, I asked the committee members what they thought the scope of the project should be. Immediately, one of the members suggested they produce an informational booklet describing all the good things the association does. She said this would be a great way to ‘market the association.’

I tried, to no avail to direct the conversation back to defining the scope of the project. By this time, the committee was fixated on the idea of producing a booklet and what the booklet should contain. Then, the conversation shifted from the idea of writing a booklet to a discussion of what political ramifications might occur, if the booklet was published. One member was concerned that the booklet should not, in any way, offend any member of the association, or any special interest group. After this discussion went nowhere, the committee moved on.

Then, I bluntly asked, “What’s the purpose of this booklet?” The committee members said that the booklet should be used to:

  • Recruit new members
  • Update active members on the association’s accomplishments
  • Educate the public
  • Influence and educate local, state, and national policy makers on issues important to the association’s membership.

In other words, the booklet would serve the needs of everyone. I said to myself, “ this ain’t gonna work.” If the booklet was written, it would have to address the unique needs of:

  • Prospective members
  • Current members
  • The public
  • Lawmakers 
(local, state, national)
  • Members of the Marketing Committee
  • The leadership of the association (after all, the leadership has to approve the budget for the production, distribution, and promotion of the booklet).

We’re getting nowhere, fast. Towards the end of the meeting, I suggested we break down the committee and form a small working group. They liked this idea. So, here’s what we did:

  1. I asked the work group, Who’s your most important target group? If the committee had selected, ‘the public’ as a target group, which they didn’t, they’d be shooting themselves in the foot (the public is 324 million people). The public has to be broken down by age, sex, geographic area, income, educational level, special interests, buying patterns, etc. They selected prospective members as their most important target group.
  1. Why is this group important? The association has many stakeholders, from the rank and file member to corporations that support the association. Why are prospective members more important than other groups? Because, prospective members will join and provide badly needed dues and non-dues revenue to ensure the financial stability of the association.
  1. What message do you want to convey to this group? Once the target group was identified, the message can be posited. In this case, the message is to inform prospective members of the benefits of joining such as having a venue to connect with other members and develop contacts encourage them to support their profession.
  1. And, last but not least, What’s the best way to communicate your message to this group? Once you know who your target is and what the message is, then select the best vehicle to communicate that message. Here’s where it gets tricky.

In order to select the most effective vehicle to communicate the message, we need to understand the purchasing habits of the prospective members. These prospects range in age from 26 – 35. For example, they prefer to receive most communication electronically. They are skeptical of traditional sales approaches.

Based on this and other demographic and psychographic data, the committee agreed to:

  • Update their current prospect list (including non-members who have previously purchased books and journals)
  • Request lists of graduate students from graduate schools
  • Update the association’s website to include a section devoted to prospective members
  • Capture email addresses of those visiting the website and those who request to receive the association’s newsletter
  • Send email newsletters to prospects
  • Use website and email to promote a special discount on membership

As of this writing, the Marketing Committee submitted a budget to the Finance Committee for approval. Let’s wait and see if the budget gets approved.

Now you can plan your marketing campaigns this order:

  1. Who’s your most important target group?
  2. Why is this group important?
  3. What message you want to convey to this group?
  4. What’s the best way to communicate your message to this group

If you follow the above four steps, you’ll be putting the horse before the cart.